THE CONCEPT OF OLD DIASPORA AND IT IMPACT IN AFRICA - Educational Assist
SUBTOTAL :

Follow Us

THE CONCEPT OF OLD DIASPORA AND IT IMPACT IN AFRICA

THE CONCEPT OF OLD DIASPORA AND IT IMPACT IN AFRICA

Short Description:

Product Description


INTRODUCTION

        ONGOING AFRICAN DIASPORAS, The recent growth of Atlantic and diasporic studies, the globalization of capital and culture, the technological revolution and the breakdown in information boundaries, all these have necessitated a rethinking of the African diaspora and its changing meanings. The nature and composition of the African diaspora have undergone significant changes over time: from the forced migration of African captives of the Old and the new worlds to the voluntary emigration of free skilled Africans in search of political asylum or economic opportunities, from a diaspora with little contact with the point of origin (Africa) to one that maintains active contact with the mother continent; all culminating on the birth of a unique African who straddles continents, worlds and cultures. Today, Africans are found on non-traditional points of migration such as Israel, Japan, Taiwan etc. In this diasporic flux, many sociological givens have been challenged and/or transformed: the boundaries of culture and religion.

MEANING OF DIASPORA
        It is the act of spreading or scattering of the people usually involuntarily to areas outside their original home and the feeling of non-fulfilment in that new home which gives birth to the desire to return home physically, culturally or psychologically. It is a scattered population whose origin lies in a separation geographic locale.
        Recently, scholars have distinguished between different kinds of diaspora, based on its causes such as imperialism, trade or labor migrations, or by the kind of social coherence within the diaspora community and its ties to the ancestral lands, some diaspora communities maintain strong political toes with their homeland. Other qualities that may be typical of many diasporas are thoughts of return, relationships with other communities in the diaspora, and lack of full integration into the host countries. Diaspora often maintain ties to the country of their historical affiliation and influence the policies of the country where they are located. The term is derived from the Greek verb “diaspeiro” which means “scatter”, “I spread about and that from “dia” which means “I sow”, “I scatter” hence meant “scattering” and was inter alia used to refer to citizens of a dominant city – states who emigrated to a conquered land with the purpose of colonization, to assimilate the territory into the empire. An example of a diaspora from classical antiquity is the century – long exile of the messenians under Spartan rule and the Ageanites as described by Thucydides in his “history of the Peloponnesian wars”. According to the “Oxford English dictionary online”, the first known recorded usage of the or diaspora in the English language in 1876 referring “extensive diaspora work of evangelizing among the national protestant churches on the continent.
        In all cases, the term diaspora carries a sense of displacement the population separated from its national territory, and usually its people have a hope or at least desire, to return to their homeland at some point of the “homeland” still exists in any meaningful sense.

        One of the largest diaspora of modern times is that of sub-Saharan Africans, which dates back several centuries. During the Atlantic slave trade, 9.4 to 12 million people from West Africa survived transportation to arrive on the Americas as slaves. This population and their descendants were major influences on the culture of British, French, Portuguese, and Spanish new world colonies. Prior to the trans-Atlantic slave trade, millions of Africans had moved and settled as merchants, seamen and slaves in different parts of Europe and Asia. From the 8th through the 19th centuries, an Arab-controlled slave trade dispersed millions of Africans to Asia and the Islands of the Indian Ocean. In BLACK EUROPE and the AFRICAN DIASPORA, Alexander Weheliye writes a section that clearly explains diaspora this way “Diaspora offers pathways that retrace laverings of difference in the aftermath of colonialism and slavery, as well as the effects of other forms of migration and displacement. Thus, diaspora enables the desdimentation of the nation from the “interior” by taking into account the groups that fail to comply with the reigning definition of the people as a cohesive political subject due to sharing one culture, one race, one language, one religion, and so on, and from the exterior’ by drawing attention to the movements that cannot be contained by the nation’s administrative and ideological borders.

0 Reviews:

Post Your Review